Evidence tends to fall into 4 categories
1. A causes B
2. A doesn’t B
3. B is good
4. B is bad

In order to “card” this article, you want to follow the following steps.

1. Read the article looking for the author to make an argument in one of those 4 categories. The statement that fits those 4 categories, we call the claim – or the sentence/argument they are making.
2. After finding that claim, you want to find the warrants – or proof or rationale to defend that claim. They make be in multiple paragraphs before or after the claim.
3. With a pen, put a “[“ at the beginning of the first paragraph that contains either one of those warrants or contains the claim. With the same pen, put a “ ]” at the end of the last paragraph that contains either one of those warrants or contains the claim. A card must be at least one paragraph. Try to avoid cards that are more than 6 paragraphs.
4. If what you are carding has page numbers (such as books), immediately after putting the final bracket ( “]” ) around the last paragraph, write the page number(s) of the card
5. Next to the paragraph(s), write a side tag, that is some summary words about that card. You may use abbreviations. You want your initial tag to be sufficient enough to avoid having to reread the card to know what it is saying. Do not stress about making it perfect – you will write a final tag later.
6. Make sure you have all of the bibliographical information you need for a complete cite written on the first page.

Now, let’s do an example. Try to find 3 cards in this article following this process.